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  1. Beechcraft Bonanza


THE BONANZA STORY

        Olive and Walter Beech

        Olive and Walter Beech

Walter H. and Olive Ann Beech founded Beech Aircraft Corporation

For more than 70 Years ago in Wichita, Kansas and revolutionized the aviation industry - building the 200-miles-per-hour Beechcraft Model 17 biplane known as the Staggerwing. What many considered an impossible task quickly became the leading choice of aircraft.

Stagger 2 Since then, Beechcraft has continued to evolve and today remains a
leader in business aviation with the broadest product line of any
manufacturer. Today, this constantpursuit of perfection is reflected by many new additions to our
lineup the new Beechcraft Bonanza G36, Baron G58, King Air C90GT,
and ........

Since then, Beechcraft has continued to evolve and today remains a leader in business aviation with the broadest product line of any manufacturer. Today, this constant
pursuit of perfection is reflected by many new additions to our lineup the new Beechcraft Bonanza G36, Baron G58, King Air C90GT, and ........

                Beech Staggerwing Cockpit

               

               Beech King Air 90 GT

Uwe Lutz - Public Relations

Your Contact

Uwe Lutz
Public Relations

Tel.: +49 171 5480 669
Uwe.Lutz@beech-bonanza.org

The Bonanza Models

MODEL 35-33 DEBONAIR

MODEL 35-33 DEBONAIR

Beech developed the Debonair to compete primarily with the new, high performance airplanes like Piper´s Comanche and Cessna´s Model 182. Priced at $19,995 (standard airplane) the four-place Debonair was intended to be distinctly different than its cousin,the Model 35 Bonanza, yet retain traditional Beechcraft quality and performance. A conventional empennage assembly was used that immediately set the Debonair apart from the Model 35. First flown on September 14, 1959, the new Beechcraft featured a very spartan interior and only exterior trim paint. When introduced in November, 1959, initial interest was strong and 233 airplanes were built the first year. Dealer acceptance was good, but Beech salesmen soon found it hard to sell the Debonair against the competition, not because of price or quality but because the airplane´s general appearance and interior ppointments were too basic and utilitarian. Powered by a six-cylinder, fuel-injected 225 hp Continental IO-470-J engine swinging a two-blade, constant-speed Hartzell propeller, the Model 35-33 had a maximum speed of at sea level and a gross weight of .

MODEL 35-A33 DEBONAIR

MODEL 35-A33 DEBONAIR

Beech revised the Debonair in 1961 to make it more appealing to potential customers. Overall exterior paint was made standard, interior features such as sun visors; seat padding, chart box and small hat shelf were added. A33 c/n started with CD-251 and 154 were built. CD-251 -CD-300 equipped with Continental 225 hp IO-470-J. CD-301 and after had IO-470-K of 225 hp. Gross weight was and maximum speed . Price increased to $21,750. Debonair illustrated has optional heated Pitot tube.

MODEL 35-B33 DEBONAIR

MODEL 35-B33 DEBONAIR

The Model 35-B33 was produced from late 1961 through 1964, and received further refinements found on the production Model 35 Bonanza. A new instrument panel was installed (same as P35 Bonanza), a small fairing added to the vertical stabilizer, the front seat backs were adjustable, a stall warning horn replaced the light used on previous models and the N35 Bonanza leading edge fuel tanks offered capacity as an option. Exterior paint scheme was more sophisticated and landing gear extension speed increased to . A total of 426 35-B33 were built. 1961 priced was $21,975 but increased to $23,500 in February, 1963. Engine remained 225 hp IO-470-K. B33 N221DE is illustrated. Note mannequin in full business suit seated behind pilot.
Instrument panel of 1961 Model 35-A33 Debonair, c/n CD-330, N252AA. Magneto switch is between throttle and propeller control.

MODEL 35-C33A DEBONAIR

MODEL 35-C33A DEBONAIR

In 1966, Beech offered the 285 hp 35-C33A equipped with Continental IO-520-B engine. Distinguished from the C33 version by its exterior paint scheme, the C33A was developed to compete with Piper´s 250 hp Comanche and to allow owners of older model Debonair to step up in horsepower and performance. Maximum speed was . A one-piece windshield improved overall appearance and became standard on all subsequent Debonair models. The engine installation was the same as the Model S35 Bonanza: canted down two degrees and right 2 1/2 degrees to reduce rudder force during takeoff and climb. Price was $29, 875; later increased to $31,000.

MODEL D33 (EXPERIMENTAL)

MODEL D33 (EXPERIMENTAL)

In 1965, the U.S. Air Force experimented with a modified Model S35, c/d D-7859, N5847K, for possible application as a light, ground attack aircraft. A conventional tail was installed and the designation changed to Model D33. A variety of ordnance could be carried, including 250-pound napalm bombs, 272-pound general purpose (GP) bombs, mini guns and 2.75-inch unguided rockets. Six wing hard points were provided, the inboard points stressed for and the outboard points stressed for . Tests were conducted at Eglin AFB, . (Courtesy Larry A. Bali)

MODEL PD 249 (EXPERIMENTAL)

MODEL PD 249 (EXPERIMENTAL)

An improved version of c/d D-7859, PD 249 was evaluated by USAF for further investigations of the airplane´s ground attack capabilities. A 350 hp Continental GIO-520 was installed for more power and a three-blade propeller was added. Wing hard points remained unchanged. Although tests were promising, the Air Force did not pursue extended development of the PD 249 and the project was cancelled in the early 1970s. PD 249 is illustrated with ordnance on all six wing hardpoints and overall three-tone camouflage scheme. (Courtesy Larry A. Bali).

MODEL E33 BONANZA

MODEL E33 BONANZA

In the 1968 model year, the Debonair became a Bonanza in name only, although both models were very similar in appearance, appointments and performance. Equipped with a 225 hp Continental 10-470 engine, the E33 had a maximum speed of at sea level, carried of fuel in standard tanks (80-gallon tanks optional), and had a sea level rate of climb of per minute. Gross weight: . Useful load: . The third cabin window, optional on earlier Debonair, was made standard on the E33. A total of 116 Model E33 Bonanzas were produced in 1968-1969 model years. Price: $31,750. Note the new, larger "Speed Sweep" windshield introduced by Beech on the 1968 Model 33 and 35 Bonanzas.

MODEL E33B/E33C

MODEL E33B/E33C

Aerobatic versions of the E33 and E33A, the Model E33B and E33C were very similar except for customer choice of engines. The E33B had 225 hp, the E33C had 285 hp and became the preferred type; no E33B were produced. Both models were licensed in the acrobatic category at gross weight or could operate at their full 3,300-pound maximum gross weight in the utility category. Primary structural changes to the standard E33-series were Queen Air aileron ribs; horizontal stabilizer used Travel Air front and rear spars; heavier gauge skin thickness on vertical stabilizer leading edge; larger rudder cables and additional stringers in aft fuselage section. 25 Model E33C were built. Price: $38,250. During aerobatic flight, only the two front seats were occupied and a quick release door was standard equipment, along with front seat shoulder harnesses, a g-meter and special fuel boost pump and unique checkerboard paint on wing and tail tips. Typical aerobatic manoeuvres approved were aileron roll, barrel roll, inside loop, Immelman, Cuban eight and split-S. 2 Model E33C are illustrated. (Courtesy Larry A. BaIl)

MODEL F33 BONANZA

MODEL F33 BONANZA

The 1970 Model F33 Bonanza was actually a refined Model E33, still using the Continental IO-470-K of 225 hp. F33 had restyled third cabin window of the Model V35B, "Speed Sweep" windshield, three gear down annunciator lights, redesigned sub panels and switches, a lower glare shield and Hartwell quick-opening latches for the engine cowling. Empty weight increased to , maximum gross weight was . Maximum speed remained at . Priced at $34,150 each, 20 Model F33 were produced, all in the 1970 model year.

MODEL F33A BONANZA & MODEL F33C BONANZA

MODEL F33A BONANZA

Two different versions of the F33A were built, the short-fuselage model produced in 1970 and the long-fuselage model built in 1971, featuring a 19-inch extension in the aft cabin section. 26 F33A were built with short fuselages. 34 were produced with the long fuselage, allowing two important benefits: a larger baggage door and six seat configurations previously available only in the Model V35B Bonanza. The 1971 F33A possessed all of the V35B´s glamour, both inside and out, with the only difference between airplanes being the choice of empennage design. Maximum speed was at sea level, but the higher gross weight of decreased rate of climb to per minute and service ceiling to . Price of the short-cabin F33A was $38,150 while the long cabin version cost $41,600. 1983 Model F33A Bonanza is illustrated.

MODEL F33C BONANZA

Five F33C aerobatic Bonanzas were built in 1970 and all were short fuselage airplanes. No F33C were built in 1971-1972. From 1973 on, all Model F33C Bonanzas featured the 19-inch longer fuselage and the same structural features of the earlier Model E33C aerobatic Bonanza. Powered by a 285 hp Continental IO-520-BB engine, the F33A seated four or five with optional fifth seat. Maximum gross weight: ; useful bad: . 23 F33C were built in 1986, including 21 for the Mexican Air Force: c/n CJ-l56-CJ-176. Mexican Air Force F33C is illustrated, flown by Beech production flight test pilot Gale McKinney. Note vortex generators on wing leading edge. 1987 Model F33C cost $ 184,500 at the factory.

MODEL G33 BONANZA

MODEL G33 BONANZA

Beech created the 1972 Model G33 Bonanza by taking the Model F33 and installing a 260 hp Continental IO-470-N powerplant. Only 50 G33 were built before production ended in 1973. Gross weight: . Price: $41,450. 1972 G33 had the improved interior configuration of the 1972 Model V35B Bonanza. Maximum speed: . Range with of fuel (optional tanks): 1,243 statute miles. (Courtesy Larry A. Bail)

MODEL E33A BONANZA

MODEL E33A BONANZA

Offered in the 1968-1969 model years, the Model E33A was identical to the E33 except for its 285 hp Continental IO-520-B powerplant. Maximum speed increased to , sea level rate of climb was per minute with a service ceiling of . Beech included a Mark 12A nav/com radio as standard equipment, later changed to the solid-state Mark 16 unit. Price: $35,750 79 E33A were produced in 1968-1969. (Courtesy Larry A. Bali)

MODEL 35 BONANZA

MODEL 35 BONANZA

A legend in its own right, the Beechcraft Model 35 Bonanza flew for the first time on December 22, 1945 with veteran Beech test pilot Vern L. Carstens at the wheel. The Bonanza met Walter H. Beech´s demand for an airplane that would carry four people and their baggage in car-like comfort at . Five engineers were assigned by Ted Wells to design the Model 35. Ralph Harmon led the team composed of Noel Naidenoff, Alex Odevseff, Jerry Gordon and Wilson Erhart (all but Erhart are known to have worked on the challenging XA-38 "Grizzly" project in 1944-1945). Certification was granted on March 25, 1947 and production of the first version, the Model 35, occurred in 1947-1948. 1,500 were built, more than any other Bonanza model. Powered by a 165 hp Continental E-165 opposed engine, the "straight had a range of 750 statute miles on of fuel. Later production Model 35s had E-185-1 engines developing 185 hp for one minute at 2300 rpm, 165 hp continuous. Gross weight was . Price: $7,975 from c/n D-l - c/n D-973, then increased to $8,945 from c/n D-974 - c/n D-1500. Model 35 illustrated were built in March, 1947. Famous V-tail was mounted at 30 degrees from horizontal. Tricycle gear was electrically operated and rugged enough for unimproved landing fields. The nose gear was not steerable on original Model 35 Bonanzas. Wood propeller featured controllable pitch but no governor device.

MODEL A35 BONANZA

MODEL A35 BONANZA

Built in 1949, the Model A35 Bonanza was the first to incorporate a box-type, sheet metal spar carry through that replaced the tubular design used in the 1947-1948 airplanes and it was the first Bonanza to be licensed in the Utility category at full gross weight of . A total of 701 A35 were produced. Other changes were:
gear down speed increased from to ; flap extended speed increased to ; steerable nose wheel installation; useful bad increased to . Model A35 illustrated has optional overall exterior paint scheme and was the 2,000th Model 35 built.

MODEL B35 BONANZA

MODEL B35 BONANZA

The Model B35 Bonanza had all the improvements found in the A35 but featured the Continental E-185-8 engine that developed 196 hp for one minute at 2450 rpm. Priced at $ 11,975, 480 B35 were produced during the 1950 sales year. Flap extension increased from 20 to 30 degrees, front and rear cabin armrests and chart pockets were minor improvements found on the Model B35. B35 illustrated has standard exterior paint scheme. Note baggage door located on right side.

MODEL 35 BONANZA "WAIKJKI BEECH"

MODEL 35 BONANZA "WAIKJKI BEECH"

Captain William Odom´s famous record transoceanic flight was made in March, 1949 flying Beechcraft Model 35 Bonanza c/n D-4. Man and machine flew non-stop from Hickam Field, of to in northern . Flying time was 36 hours, 2 minutes. Odom is shown in this photograph with c/n D-4 after the historic flight.

Model 35 Bonanza

1948 Model 35 Bonanza in optional overall paint scheme.

Model 35 Bonanza

1948 Model 35 Bonanza instrument panel. Note color-coded arcs and radial lines on airspeed indicator required on all civil aircraft after 1946. Top of white are for flap
extension is.

MODEL C35/D35/E35 BONANZA

MODEL C35/D35/E35 BONANZA

The Model C35 Bonanza was built from late 1950 through the 1952 sales year. Significant changes included a more powerful Continental E-185-1 1 developing 185 hp continuous and 205 hp at takeoff for one minute. Chord of the V-tail was increased 20% and the V-angle increased to 33 degrees. Gross weight was and maximum speed . 719 C35 were manufactured and were priced at $ 12,990 initially but increased to $ 1952. Model D35 of 1952 had new exterior paint scheme and 298 were produced. D35 sold for $18,990. 1954 Model E35 Bonanza offered two engines: E-185-11 of 185 hp continuous or the new Continental E-225-8 developing 225 hp at takeoff for one minute at 2450 rpm. Model E35 cost $18,990 with E-185-11, $19,990 with E-225-8 engine. 1951 Model C35 is illustrated. Note retracted assist step.

Model F35 Bonanza

Model F35 Bonanza

1950 Model C35 instrument panel shows refinement in instrument and control placement. Note flat, energy-absorbing control wheel first installed on Model B35 Bonanza.

MODEL F35 - MODEL M35 BONANZA

MODEL F35 - MODEL M35 BONANZA

Beech added a third cabin window to the 1955 Model F35 Bonanza along with heavier aluminium skin thickness on the wing leading edges and strengthening of the V-tail spar cap. F35 was available with E- 185-11 or E-225-8 engine and most customers preferred the higher horsepower E-225-8. 392 Model F35 were built and cost $19,990 with the 225 hp Continental. The 1956 Model G35 featured the E-225-8 as standard equipment, gross weight was gear extension speed increased to . Windshield thickness increased to 1/4 inch. 476 G35 were produced. Price was $21 ,990. Model H35 of 1957 featured new 240 hp O-470-G engine, Model 50 Twin Bonanza wing spar caps and leading edge skin of reduced thickness and V-tail spar caps and elevators were strengthened. 464 Model H35 were manufactured, priced at $22,650 each.

Model J35

In 1958, the Model J35 was the first fuel-injected Bonanza, using Continental´s 250 hp IO-470-C and cost $24,300. 396 Model J35 were built. The Model K35 Bonanza was first to have fuel capacity and optional fifth seat in aft cabin. Gross weight was .
A total of 436 Model K35 were manufactured in the 1959 sales year. K35 cost $25,300. Maximum speed: . There were no significant changes to the 1960 Model M35 Bonanza except for a new wingtip design. 400 M35 were produced. 1956 Model G35 is illustrated.

MODEL N35/P35 BONANZA

MODEL N35/P35 BONANZA

Beech revamped the already classic Bonanza in 1961 by adding a new, larger third cabin window and installing a 260 hp Continental IO-470-N engine in the Model N35. Gross weight increased to 3,125 Pounds but the extra weight caused rate of climb to decrease from the Model M35´s 1,170 fpm (feet per minute) to 1,150 fpm. 280 Model N35 Bonanzas were produced. Price was $26,500. The 1962 Model P35 Bonanza had a completely redesigned instrument panel featuring avionics mounted to the right of center panel, new subpanels and all flight instruments were shock-mounted in a separate, hinged panel in front of the pilot. 467 Model P35 were built. Price: $27,650.

Model N35 Bonanza

Model N35 Bonanza
illustrated shows fixed assist step first installed on Model N35.

MODEL S35 BONANZA

MODEL S35 BONANZA

MODEL S35 BONANZA

MODEL S35 BONANZA

Produced in the 1964-1965 model year, the Model S35 Bonanza´s fuselage length was increased allowing six occupants to he seated in the cabin when optional fifth/sixth seats were installed. The third cabin window was reshaped and Continental´s IO-520-B engine through 285 hp to the Bonanza for the first time. The fuel injected powerplant was mounted in a redesigned cradle that was canted down 2 degrees and right 2 1/2 degrees to reduce rudder forces during takeoff and climb. The S35 Bonanza was also the fastest built up to that time, with a maximum speed of . A total of 667 Model S35 was built. Price: $28,750.

MODEL V35/V35A BONANZA

MODEL V35/V35A BONANZA

Beech introduced the Model V35 Bonanza in 1966, powered with the 285 hp Continental IO-520-B that gave a maximum speed of at sea level. Gross weight was . There were few changes from the Model S35 Bonanza, the most salient being a one-piece windshield. Price was $32,500. 543 Model V35 Bonanzas were produced in 1966- 1968, the Model V35A featured the new "Speed-Sweep" windshield of increased area. The leading edge of the windshield was mounted six inches farther forward than previous Bonanzas and possessed 12 degrees more slope angle. A total of 426 Model V35A was built. In 1968 Beech renamed the Debonair "Bonanza and all subsequent Model 35s were denoted by the prefix "V ", with each derivative version identified by a suffix letter. The 1968 V35A was the first Bonanza to adopt the new classification system. Maximum speed: ; service ceiling: . Price: $36,850. 1966 Model V35 Bonanza is illustrated. Note fixed assist step.

MODEL V35TC/V35A-TC/V35B-TC BONANZA

MODEL V35TC/V35A-TC/V35B-TC BONANZA

Beech developed the turbocharged Model V35TC in 1966 when turbo charging and high altitude flying were becoming more commonplace for general aviation airplanes. Using the Continental 285 hp TSIO-520-D, the V35TC could maintain full rated power up to where it had a maximum speed of . Priced at $37,750, 79 V35TC were produced in 1966-1967. Oxygen system and electro-thermal propeller deice were two popular options for the Model V35TC Bonanza. For 1968-1969 model years, the Model V35A-TC incorporated the "Speed-Sweep" windshield and other improvements found on the naturally-aspirated Model V35A. A total of 46 Model V35A-TC was built. Price: $42,750. The last turbocharged Beechcraft Bonanza until the Model A36TC of 1979 was the 1970 Model V35B-TC. Only seven were produced. Three gear down annunciator lights were standard, Baron-type fuel gauges were installed and Hartwell quick-release cowling latches were employed. Powered by a 285 hp TSIO-520-D powerplant, The V35B-TC`s maximum speed was at with a cruise speed of at , full throttle/2500 rpm. Model V35B-TC was not produced in 1971.

Model V35TC Bonanza

1966 Model V35TC Bonanza is illustrated.

The only known armed V-tail, a V35A [VP-WHM] sported two .30 Browning in underwing pods to provide cover for transport vehicles in the Rhodesian Bush War c.1980, also served as a first-strike aircraft.

MODEL V35B BONANZA

MODEL V35B BONANZA

1970 was the first year for the Model V35B Bonanza. Only minor changes were implemented, including three gears down annunciator lights, anti-slosh fuel bladder ceils and new interior styling. 218 V35B were produced in 1970. Price: $41,600. The 1972 Model V35B received a major interior redesign that required structural changes to the upper cabin sections. More durable materials were employed and the overhead fresh air ventilation system was improved. Price was $4 1,600 and 104 were built in 1978 the V35B received a 24-volt electrical system, 4-second gear retraction/extension time. Beech built the 10,000th Model 35 Bonanza, c/n D-l0000, on February 9, 1977. The airplane was flown on a nationwide tour to celebrate the Model 35´s 30-year dominance of the high performance, single-engine market. The last Model 35 built was V35B c/n D-10403, delivered to Beech production flight test department on November 11, 1982 and delivered to a Beech dealer in May, 1984. Last Model 35 delivered to a retail customer was V35B c/n D-10399, delivered in August, 1984.

MODEL 035 BONANZA (EXPERIMENTAL)

MODEL 035 BONANZA (EXPERIMENTAL)

Beech built the Model 035 Bonanza in 1961 as an experimental tested featuring a laminar flow wing with integral (wet) fuel cells in the leading edge, replacing rubber bladder tanks. The tricycle landing gear was modified with trailing beam-type main gear assemblies and new gear doors. The nose gear remained unchanged. A 260 hp Continental IO-470-N engine powered the 035. Despite the advantage of increased fuel capacity, wingtip fuel filler access and smoother landing gear operation, the 035 was not developed beyond the experimental stage. (Courtesy Larry A. Ball)

Model V35B instrument panel with engine instrument cluster at center, flight instruments on shock-mounted panel, subpanel switches/autopilot mode controller at left and circuit breakers on right subpanel.

MODEL 36/A36 BONANZA Instruments

Panel A36 with some additional instruments.

MODEL 36/A36 BONANZA

Based on the 1968 Model E33 Bonanza, Beech´s Model 36 was created by moving the E33A´s aft cabin bulkhead back and adding a 10-inch section to the fuselage. The wing was relocated aft, placing pilot and passengers farther forward on the wing, thereby increasing the CG range and stability of the airplane. Two outward-opening doors were installed on the right fuselage side that permitted easy passenger or cargo loading and unloading. The doors could be removed for flight. Powered by a 285 hp Continental 10-520 engine, maximum speed was and the Model 36 was licensed in the Utility category at its maximum gross weight of . An immediate success when introduced in June, 1968, the Model 36 was primarily aimed at the air taxi or light cargo market. Three interiors were offered: standard, utility and a deluxe design. Priced at $40,650, 105 were built in 1968 and 1970 Beech added a more luxurious interior similar to the Model V35B, three gear down annunciator lights, Hartwell quick-release cowling latches and redesigned instrument subpanels to create the Model A36 Bonanza. Redesigned wing tips changed span from on the Model 36 to six inches on the A36. 56 were built in 1970 and 1972 electrically-operated, vertical-readout engine instruments were standard and in 24-volt electrical system and 4-second gear retraction/extension time were incorporated, beginning with A36 c/n E- major change occurred in 1984 when Beech completely redesigned the instrument panel. Separate shaft-type control wheels, circular, vertically-stacked engine instruments were mounted on the new instrument panel that was canted back at the top for easier pilot scanning, and quadrant-mounted throttle/propeller/mixture controls were installed. Small, wedge like vortex generators were added to the outboard wing leading edge for improved roll control at high angle of attack.

A36

The engine changed to a 300 hp (takeoff and continuous) Continental IO-550-B. Takeoff gross weight increased to . 95 A36 were built in 1984

A36AT

A36AT (1994) illustrated is a noise reduced (71.2 dBa) A36. 25 were built for instruction.

MODEL A36TC BONANZA

MODEL A36TC BONANZA

After a nine-year absence, Beech re-entered the single-engine turbocharged market in 1979 with the Model A36TC Bonanza powered by a Continental TSIO-520-UB engine developing 300 hp. Beech engineers eliminated cowl flaps by designing a series of air cooling louvers that provided adequate airflow inside the engine compartment. The absence of cowl flaps was viewed as both a reduction in maintenance and pilot workload. The standard Model A36 Bonanza cabin heating system was revised to produce 20% more heat to keep cabin occupants warm during high altitude flights. The A36TC was a welcome addition to Beech´s product line and 32 were produced the first year, from c/n EA-1 to c/n EA-32. Fuel capacity remained at useable and maximum certificated altitude was . A36TC illustrated is c/n EA-1, N36TC, a company demonstrator.

MODEL B36TC BONANZA

MODEL B36TC BONANZA

Sales success with the Model A36TC lcd to the improved Model B36TC in 1981. Significant changes were incorporated into the turbocharged, six-seat Beechcraft, including a completely redesigned instrument panel with separate, shaft-type control wheels, and quadrant mounted throttle/propeller/mixture controls and circular, vertically mounted engine instruments. Fuel capacity was increased to maximum ( useable) and wingspan increased from , (A36TC) to , . Wedge-like, vortex generators were installed on the wing leading edge to improve roll control at high angle of attack. Minor improvements were made to the engine/turbocharger installation and air conditioning was available as an option. Maximum takeoff gross weight increased to . Engine: Continental TSIO-520-UB rated at 300 hp (continuous). Cruise speed at maximum power ( Hg manifold pressure/2400 rpm): 200 knots TAS (true airspeed), ISA conditions at . B36TC c/n start at EA-242 and 50 were built in 1982, 1983. 1987 c/n start with EA-462.

MODEL T36TC (EXPERIMENTAL)

MODEL T36TC (EXPERIMENTAL)

Model T36TC Bonanza-In the late Seventies, Beech engineers began exploring the feasibility of a pressurized Bonanza. As part of the preliminary study, a standard A36 was modified with a T-tail and a 325 hp TSIO-520 was installed the size and weight of which required a 12-in cowl extension. First flown in February total of 82 hours was accumulated during 89 flights over the next year. Unfortunately, by the end of 1982, the industry's single-engine sales had fallen to just one-quarter of what it had been three years earlier. The design was never put into production, but Beech renewed its effort as it turned to what it felt was the wave of the future pressurized turbine singles.

The Bonanza Overview

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